Archives for posts with tag: Northern New Mexico
Lower Frijoles Canyon

Overview:

Frijoles Canyon is where the gorges get gorgeous; half hike and half secular sacrament. The tread is obvious and the navigation straightforward. Are you new to exploing the high country in New Mexico? This hike was made for you.

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Peñasco Blanco

Overview:

Roughly 1200 years ago the Ancestral Puebloans raised monumental rock structures along Chaco Wash. This hike follows the Wash past several enormous structures, turns back at the Peñasco Blanco ruin and finishes by ascending a narrow cleft to a pair of the high pueblos. Go! There is no better way of introducing newcomers to hiking in the desert southwest.

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01 South Sandia Summit from north

South Sandia Peak seen from the north, along the Sandia Crest

Overview:

This is a fun and strenuous alternative to the much-traveled Embudito Trail. The Embudito Trail lies near the bottom of Embudito Canyon and its views are limited by canyon walls. The Oso Ridge Trail is placed high on the Canyon’s northern rim and has terrific views down to the Albuquerque Basin, west to Mount Taylor and north to the cliffs adorning the Northern Sandias. The Embudito Trail makes long switchbacks across the Sandia’s imposing high face, producing a relatively gentle ascent. The Oso Ridge Trail faces squarely into the fall line, producing a steep ascent. On either trail you will get to South Sandia summit. From the summit this route descends along the Embudito Trail to Oso Pass and then departs onto the Whitewash trail and finishes with a brief road walk back to the trailhead. It is a terrific workout.

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01 North Truchas PeakOverview:

This two-day backpack begins with a riparian ramble through forests of Douglas fir and Engelmann spruce, meanders through stands of tall aspen, ascends across a series of narrow riverside meadows and segues to a series of switchbacks that rise swiftly to a beautiful tarn-side camp. This same tread leads onward to a col separating the north-flowing Rio Santa Barbara from the south-flowing Pecos River. From the col it’s an off-trail scramble up the wide-open slopes of North Truchas Peak – home to mountain goats and an eagle’s view of the Santa Fe Mountains. Allot all the time you can (it still won’t be enough).

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Truchas, N Truchas, Chimayosos over cairn top

Truchas (left), North Truchas (center) and Chimayosos Peaks (right)

Overview:

Is it possible for a short backpacking trip to be “impossibly scenic”? Inquiring minds need to know. Pack your gear, jump in that car and get the answer to your question with a strenuous scramble into the heart of the Santa Fe Mountains. There are streams, deer, high peaks, bugling elk, tarns, soaring fir forests, mountain goats, sunny meadows, gorgeous views and sore, sore quads in your future. This is why we have the word terrific.

The trail is also demanding and lonesome. A party fresh from sea level, youngsters, acrophobes, route-finding novices or out-of-shape scramblers are advised to look at other routes. Others, give this a go!

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01 Truchas, center peak, N Truchas, Chimayosos

(South) Truchas, North Truchas and Chimayosos Peaks

Overview:

Truchas (Spanish for “trout”) may be 60 feet lower than Wheeler Peak, but it is far more isolated and far less visited. The mountain lies directly at the heart of the Santa Fe Mountains, an empress of altitude in spectacular high country. Billions have been spent on stadiums and museums to console the disconsolate who’ve no access to this style of hiking. The lucky will hike through a comprehensive tour of the Canadian, Hudsonian and arctic-alpine life zones: climbing through dense Douglas fir forest, sauntering across gorgeous meadows and arriving where the tough alpine grasses grudgingly give way to rock and lichen. Pick a couple nice days, hoist your pack and allow your expectations to soar. You won’t be disappointed.

Weather can be an issue. I turned back when the surrounding stratocumuli demonstrated cumulonimbus aspirations. As a result this description ends in the grassland below the summit.

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