Archives for posts with tag: Northern New Mexico
Peñasco Blanco

Overview:

Roughly 1200 years ago the Ancestral Puebloans raised monumental rock structures along Chaco Wash. This hike follows the Wash past several enormous structures, turns back at the Peñasco Blanco ruin and finishes by ascending a narrow cleft to a pair of the high pueblos. Go! There is no better way of introducing newcomers to hiking in the desert southwest.

Driving Directions:

  • From I-25 near Bernalillo (just north of Albuquerque) take exit 142 for US-550 North.
  • At the end of the ramp turn onto the north-bound lanes of US-550. If you are coming from the south then the ramp will be 0.2 miles long and you will want to follow it as it follows an extensive bend to the driver’s left.
  • After 112.6 miles on US-550, after a National Park sign for Chaco Canyon Culture Nation Park and after mile marker 112, turn left onto Indian Service Road 7061. There is no sign naming this road, but about 100 feet down the road is a large NP sign for Chaco Canyon National Historic Park.
  • After 5.0 miles on ISR 7061 turn right onto County Road 7950 (signed). This road is initially paved, but turns to gravel in 2.9 miles.
  • After 12.4 on CR 7950 miles veer sharply left onto CR-7900 (not signed). The turn is obvious – there is a “straight ahead” option but that alternative sees very much less traffic.
  • After 5.8 miles on CR7950 (which becomes paved as you enter the park) come to the Vistor’s Center. Registration is required, see below, so stop in. On exiting turn right to continue on the Park’s Loop Road. You will pass several ancient pueblos on the Loop Road and each is worth a substantial visit.
  • After 3.4 miles on the Loop Road come to a junction where an extension road (not named) continues straight down the wash towards the trailhead. (The Loop Road goes left at the junction). Go straight ahead. Note: there is a parking lot just before this junction for the Pueblo Bonito and Chetro Ketl complexes. Both are amazing.
  • After 0.4 miles, in the parking lot at end of the extension, park your car.
Sign at start of ISR 7061

It is also possible to come into Chaco Canyon from the south, on NM-57. On this date I drove that way while leaving the park and the experience cannot be recommended. It was perfectly passable for high-clearance vehicles but it is a dusty, bumpy, long, slow drive. Deep ruts could be found mid-road in all the low spots, frequently accompanied by tall piles of displaced dirt. A low-slung sedan would not be happy with this experience. There are numerous cattle guards in the road. Sometimes the initial ridge on the cattle guard can be exposed several inches above the roadbed. It is tire hell. Definitely stay away from NM-57 if the conditions are wet.

Trailhead:

Rutwo below the north canyon wall

A park fee is charged at the Visitor’s Center. Each car is $25. If you come in by some other means then it is $15 per person. National Park and military passes are accepted in lieu of payment. Ranger guided tours are available. I briefly overlapped with a guided group and it seems like a good option. The restrooms are currently closed although port-a-potties are available. There are trash receptacles. There is quite a museum and drinking water is said to be available in the Visitors Center.

At the trailhead you might want to leave your pack in the car and go get the paperwork out of the trail register. The paperwork records the date on which you start your hike and the make and model of your car. This paperwork just gives the rangers an edge at finding the lost hikers. You will need to return to your car to leave part of the registration ticket on your dashboard. Now pick up your pack and off you go!

Data:

The altitude gained and lost is small, although acrophobes may want to stay off the steep climb up to Pueblo Alto.

Distance: 10.8 miles

Hike Description:

Follow the broad gravel road as it heads northwest, past the trail register. A relatively small ruin know as Kin Kletso (Yellow House) is well-preserved and very much worth exploring. This construction makes use of relatively large and uniform sandstone blocks that resemble bricks. Evidently this style of construction arose later than the style found in other complexes such as Chetro Ketl. Behind the ruins a trail leads steeply onto the canyon rim, as described below.

Casa Chiquita

The roadbed bends sharply into a side canyon but swings right back, reaching Casa Chiquita in1.2 miles. The centuries have been less kind to the “Small House” (although it anything still standing after 1000 years gets good marks for ruggedness). With 50 rectangular rooms and two large round-rooms it tells a story of enormous public commitment, even while distaining to name what aroused that commitment. It is reported that this ruin has not been excavated, so some of the rooms hide beneath wind-deposited sand and silt.

At this point the road narrows into a single track, but one that obviously receives a great deal of expert care and attention. You won’t get lost. At 1.7 miles take a fork to the right (signed as Petroglyph Trail) to follow a side loop that keeps close to the north-eastern canyon wall. At scattered points along the wall the ancestral puebloans pecked images and geometric shapes that have survived the ensuing millennium. Spirals are a very common motif, although it is not obvious what this meant to the artists. The Una Vida trail (near the Visitor’s Center) has at least one glyph depicting a person holding a spiral like a shield.

This is parched terrain. Four-wing saltbush, apache plume, and claret cactus all dwell here, competing for water but not for sunlight. Signs warn of the danger where the trail crosses the Wash bottom. That is probably true, but on this date the key element (water) just wasn’t present. Looking further down canyon (northwest) you will see a wall. This is not a dam, but rather the confluence where the Chaco Wash joins the Chaco River. At 3.2 miles come to a puzzling sign saying “Supernova Pictograph”. Look directly above the sign for rock art showing a hand, a moon, and an image often interpreted as the supernova of 1054 (bright enough to remain visible during the day for 23 days)

Once-Oculated Rock

The trail gently switchbacks up onto the southwest rim of the canyon, bringing you to the site of the Peñasco Blanco complex at 4.1 miles. This site, like Casa Chiquita seems to be preserved for future excavation. The visible walls, unprotected by the canyon, have taken a beating by frost and sun. The remaining walls show extraordinary artfulness, with alternating rows of larger and smaller rock panels. Evidently this work was either meant for the amusement of wall-builders or as offerings to the supernatural since these rocks were usually covered with adobe and hidden from sight.

Pueblo Bonito

Return the way you came. Energetic hikers can then take the trail leading from behind the Kin Kietso site to the northeast rim. The tread leaps up the northeast wall, using a cleft behind a fin of rock to bring you to the top. From the rim you have many options, including a spectacular overlook of Pueblo Bonito and a loop trail that will take you past the Pueblo Alto complex.

Recommendations:

Standard desert hiking advice holds, including:

  • Your car can fail out here. Bring gear. You want to have extra clothing (adequate for waiting out a cold night), extra water in the car, jumper cables, a well-greased jack and an inflated spare tire. Check your gear before leaving home.
  • There might be a cell tower in the park, but that is line-of-sight transmission and there are long miles in the surrounding canyon land where you will have no cell coverage. As always, it is a good idea to have someone outside of your hiking group who knows your travel and hiking itinerary.
  • There are long stretches of trail where there is no protection from the sun. Even in October that can be draining. Water, sunscreen, sunglasses are necessities. If you have a larger group then it would be a great idea to have a couple umbrellas to provide shade if someone gets too roasted.
Pueblo Bonito door frames

The park’s campground is very popular and currently is offered on a first-come, first-served basis. If you do want to camp then you will also want to come with backup plans.

Links:

The Hiking and Walking site has a nice description of the Peñasco Blanco hike, which includes a chart of elevation change (and obligatory warnings about the quality of the roadbed leading into the park!).

The folks at Explore New Mexico give the loop route to Pueblo Alto a big thumbs up. Their post includes some photos of people ascending up the slot that leads to the rim of the canyon.

Taos News also has a writeup, which includes some of the history and a warning about the changeable weather in the desert.

There is a detailed description of this hike at the Hiking Arizona site (a great general resource for southwest hiking).

01 South Sandia Summit from north

South Sandia Peak seen from the north, along the Sandia Crest

Overview:

This is a fun and strenuous alternative to the much-traveled Embudito Trail. The Embudito Trail lies near the bottom of Embudito Canyon and its views are limited by canyon walls. The Oso Ridge Trail is placed high on the Canyon’s northern rim and has terrific views down to the Albuquerque Basin, west to Mount Taylor and north to the cliffs adorning the Northern Sandias. The Embudito Trail makes long switchbacks across the Sandia’s imposing high face, producing a relatively gentle ascent. The Oso Ridge Trail faces squarely into the fall line, producing a steep ascent. On either trail you will get to South Sandia summit. From the summit this route descends along the Embudito Trail to Oso Pass and then departs onto the Whitewash trail and finishes with a brief road walk back to the trailhead. It is a terrific workout.

Driving Directions:

  • Take Interstate-25 (I-25) north through Albuquerque and get off at exit 232 for Paseo Del Norte Blvd NE / NM-423.
  • After 0.1 miles merge into the left-most lane of the Pan American Frontage Road N. You will want to move over into the two right-most lanes on the Frontage Road.
  • After 0.3 miles stay to the right of a traffic island at the intersection with Paseo Del Norte Blvd NE / NM-423. Turn right onto NM-423, going east to the Sandias.
  • After 4.8 miles, at a T-intersection, turn right (going south) onto Tramway Blvd.
  • After 3.1 miles, at a light, go left onto Montgomery Blvd.
  • After 0.5 miles, at a four-way stop, turn left onto Glenwood  Hills Drive NE.
  • After 0.5 miles turn right onto Trailhead Road NE
  • After 0.2 miles arrive at the trailhead at the end of Trailhead Road NE.

(This route works for those who are coming into Albuquerque from the north – like me. For many people, particularly those coming into Albuquerque from the east, it will be much shorter to take the Tramway Blvd exit from I-40 and head north on Tramway Blvd to where it intersects Montgomery Blvd then continue as above).

Trailhead:

02 Mighty Camry at Embudito Trailhead

The mighty Camry in Embudito Canyon

The trailhead is a paved parking area. There are no fees. I did not see any trash cans, toilets or water. Entrance to the parking area is gated, but the gates were wide open at 7:00 a.m. on a Saturday morning. I did not see any signs indicating that the gates are routinely closed. You can check the hours of operation on Albuquerque’s Open Space webpage. There are several homes adjacent to the parking area – early-arriving hikers should try to minimized noise.

Data:

  • Starting Elevation: 6240 feet
  • Ending Elevation: 9782 feet
  • Elevation Gained: 3542 feet
  • Miles: 10.0 miles round trip
  • Maps: USGS Sandia Mountains quadrangle (for trailhead) and Tijeras quadrangle (for summit)

Hike Description:

03 Embudito Trail #192

Sign for Embudito Trail #192

From the north edge of the parking lot (left side, as you drive in), walk up over a berm and drop down to its far side, then follow the trail as it heads alongside the berm into the canyon. The trail soon pulls out into the canyon bottom and in less than 100 yards goes through a fence opening, passing an iron sign for the Embudito Trail #192.

 

04 North Rim Embudito Canyon

Height of initial rise

The trail crosses the canyon outflow and continues along the south-facing side of a small rise – this is the north rim of Embudito Canyon where it descends to the canyon mouth. I did not notice a path going up onto the rise, but the terrain is completely open and it is no trouble scrambling up onto the height of the rise. On the height you will find a well defined climber’s tread. Turn your back to the Albuquerque basin and ascend. It is steep in places and foot placement becomes an important task. Don’t become too absorbed in that one aspect of the hike! Behind you are great views out to Mt Taylor (a little hazy on this date) and Cabezon, while to your left lie the huge cliff faces of the Sandia’s northern ridgeline.

 

05 Sandia Ridge from N Embudito Rim

View from rim: South Sandia Peak is the high-point on the right and your approach is between the two knolls immediately north (to the left) of the peak

After 1.4 miles you get a small reprieve, descending gently in terrain populated by numerous junipers and jumbles of strikingly rounded boulders (the weather can be hard on a young rock). There is a potential bailout point, marked with a cairn, that departs to the south (right on ascent), which may lead to the bottom of Embudito Canyon. Continue straight on Oso Trail and you’ll find that your reprieve is over – the rim invites you to engage your quads and make some altitudinal gains. The reward is a high point at 2.5 miles from the trailhead. Here you will find a useful glimpse of your destination. South Sandia Peak is the local high-point on the Crest. You can see it on the right side of the picture above. North of the summit (to its left in the photo) lie a series of crest-top knolls. The first knoll north of South Sandia Peak has a cliff-like face. You will be ascending in the darkly forested region north (left) of that cliff face.

07 Battlement Cliff

Nearing Vertical Forest: battlement-topped cliff

You now get a great rim-top ramble. Views open to the bowl on your left (which contains the Pino Canyon trail) . Juniper fades to pinyon and pinyon to ponderosa. The tread climbs up each bump along the canyon rim, sometimes followed by a steep descent but always with greater gain than loss. Where the tread crosses glades you will see the battlement-like top of the first knoll north of South Sandia Peak. Sometimes the tread lunges south, appearing to aim directly at South Sandia, but have no fear.

7a first Crest views

First views from the Crest, looking north

The cliff face eventually pulls near (staying on your right) and the terrain begins to seriously steepen. The sandy tread segues to forest duff. Big Douglas Fir crowd the path as you enter the Vertical Forest. The tread makes a half-hearted switchback or two, but there is not enough room for such indulgences. Eventually the trail is forced to cut north across  the waterway. Slogging upward, you will find a incursion of scrub oak lunging down the hillside on your left. The tread flees back across the canyon bed and plunges into the Douglas fir. Slowly, there appears a hint of light coming from low between those big tree-trunks up above. Could that be the Crest? Or is this a deceitful and cruel transition into steep and impenetrable Gambel Oak? Pop out of the firs, pass a sharply leaning single-seed juniper surrounded by small aspen and then, boom!, you are on the Crest.

08 summit view

Summit view: northeast to Ortiz Range (middle ground) and faint Sangre de Cristo Range (left horizon)

Just past the aspen, 4.0 miles from the trailhead, you will come to a faint T-intersection with an informal trail that runs along the west side of the Crest. (We will call this tread the West-Crest Trail). Turn south (to your right on ascent) and follow the tread over that now-familiar “first knoll”, drop to a saddle and ascend through trees to reach a cliffy section below the summit. Find a path up the rocks and arrive at South Sandia Summit, 9782 feet above sea level. This summit is often exposed to chilly winds. Fortunately there is a well-protected notch on the summit’s east side. On a clear day you will have great views: southeast to Ladron Peak, west to Taylor, north to the highpoint of the Sandias, and northeast to the Ortiz Mountains (mid distance) and the Sangre de Cristo Range (horizon). Views south and southeast are blocked by trees.

10 Summit Block from south across meadow

View back, across the broad meadow to the summit block

You could return to the West-Crest Trail and continue south, but on a windy day it is worth departing the summit east on a trail that quickly crosses the above-mentioned notch, descends to an escarpment-like rock wall, follows the wall south (to where the wall sinks into the soil) and then descends very steeply off of the summit block. This will deposit you in a large meadow. Here the trail pretty much disappears. Cross the meadow angling to the west (to your right). This will return you to the west side of the crest and back to the West-Crest Trail. Turn left (south) and follow the tread as it enters an enormous open bowl, home to innumerable scrub oak.

10 descent into Oso Pass

Oso Pass: trail to left is Three Guns Spring, trail to right is Embudito. Go straight up the leaf-lined gully for the Whitewash trail

The trail angles down into the bowl and at 4.9 miles ends at an intersection with the Embudito Trail (currently signed!).  Turn downhill (to the right) on the Embudito trail and follow it as it gently traverses two or three open bowls. Reaching a large rib the trail turns downhill and descends swiftly to Oso Pass. At the Pass you could turn right to stay on the Embudito Trail or turn left to head north along the Three Guns Trail. Both trails are signed. Instead, go across the pass to what looks like a small gully and ascend from the pass on the (unsigned) Whitewash Trail.

11 boulders, ponderosa and cliff faces

Ponderosa, bolders and views

The upper Whitewash is one of the prettiest places on the west face of the Sandias. It is the domain of widely spaced Ponderosa and Douglas fir, sunny glades, enormous egg-shaped boulders and occasional views to the Sandias and the Albuquerque basin. It seems unnaturally flat, its long shelves of erosion resistant rock joined by short, sharp descents. At 7.2 miles from the trailhead, come to a small meadow where the trail forks. The more deeply worn tread falls off to the left, while a much less worn tread veers off to the right.

12 junction at head of Sunset Canyon

Well-used left fork and less-used right fork, which might return to Embudito

Here you are at the head of Sunset Canyon. The map suggests that if you take the less-traveled trail to the right you would be returned directly into Embudito Canyon. On this date, however, I took the more-traveled fork left (this fork is shadowed in the photo, but you can get a larger and clearer image on a computer screen if you click the image). This tread goes onto the rim separating Sunset Canyon in the north from Embudo Canyon in the South. Most people descending this path are interested in getting to the Embudo trailhead. Follow this tread and you soon find that it departs the top of the rim and clings to the north-facing wall of Sunset Canyon (contouring around a large bump on the rim). At 7.7 miles the trail regains the top of the rim. A cairn marks an intersection where a trail goes left to descend into Embudo Canyon. Keep going straight, staying up on the rim of Sunset Canyon.

13 view across Sunset and Embudito Canyons

View to north rim of Sunset Canyon and beyond to Sandia Peak

The rim begins making a series of steps, dropping rapidly through pinyon pine and down into the realm of juniper. The trail bed on these drops is covered with pea-sized gravel. Take your time. The tread amounts to a steep pile of ball bearings. At 8.9 miles the trail reaches a saddle and an intersection, go right and descend the few remaining feet to the bottom of Sunset Canyon. Here the trail braids out immensely. Cross the canyon and pick up a good tread near the wall on the north side. Turn downhill towards the houses at the mouth of the canyon. Pass through a gate in a wire fence (unsigned) and onto Cedarbrook Avenue (paved). Descend Cedarbrook and turn right onto Glenwood Hills Drive, follow that to Trailhead Road, and ascend Trailhead Road to return to your vehicle (about 0.8 miles on road).

Recommendations:

14 summit pose

December: goose down and fleece!

This route is one of the steeper trails leading up to the Sandia Crest. If you have a party that is not well adapted for altitude then you might want to find a less challenging tread. On the other hand, if this proves to your liking then you might want to consider scrambling to the high-point of the Sandia Mountains via TWA canyon.

If there is snow or ice on the ground then you’ll need traction devices. This is especially true if you are going to descend along the Vertical Forest portion of the trail. Poles and microspikes would be required. If it is truly icy then you might want full-on crampons.

I went through a liter of water on a cold December day. On a warmer day you’d want a multiple of that.

The new sign at the junction of the Embudito Trail and the informal tread I’ve called “West-Crest Trail” is loosely attached to its post. On this date the wind was banging it around. Eventually that sign will split off unless someone helps. If you’re going up in the near future please consider bringing along a crescent wrench and tightening the hex-head screws. (Leave a comment so others will know, thanks)!

In the future I would try the right fork at the head of Sunset Canyon. If it “goes” then the road-walk can be avoided.

Links:

My interest in this hike was initially spurred by an exceptional trail report on the Paint, Dig, Write, Hike, Gaze site. That author descended along the full length of the Embudito Trail rather than switching to the Whitewash – it is a good option to consider.

The ASCHG has a brief write-up of this trail. It includes a very useful map. As with the report mentioned above, this route also descends entirely on the Embudito Trail. (Note: there is another Oso Ridge Trail in California, don’t get confused!)

The Strava site has an interesting variation in which you follow the north rim of Embudito Canyon up through the Vertical Forest to the Crest. Then turn back and descend the forest. At the point where you return to the rim they depict a trail descending into Embudito Canyon and then down the canyon and back to the car.

 

 

 

01 North Truchas PeakOverview:

This two-day backpack begins with a riparian ramble through forests of Douglas fir and Engelmann spruce, meanders through stands of tall aspen, ascends across a series of narrow riverside meadows and segues to a series of switchbacks that rise swiftly to a beautiful tarn-side camp. This same tread leads onward to a col separating the north-flowing Rio Santa Barbara from the south-flowing Pecos River. From the col it’s an off-trail scramble up the wide-open slopes of North Truchas Peak – home to mountain goats and an eagle’s view of the Santa Fe Mountains. Allot all the time you can (it still won’t be enough).

Driving Directions:

  • From Interstate-25, going north, take exit 276 for NM-599 north, signed for Espanola.
  • After 0.2 miles, at the end of the ramp, turn left onto NM-599 north.
  • After 13.2 miles take the left-hand fork for the ramp onto US-84 West/US-285 North
  • After 0.5 miles, at the end of the ramp, merge onto US-84 W/US-285 N
  • After 19.3 miles, at a lighted intersection, turn right onto La Puebla Rd./ CR 88
  • After 2.7 miles, at a T-intersection, turn right onto NM-76 N.
    • NM-76 goes into Truchas, NM where it makes a sharp 90-degree turn to the left at 12.5 mile from the CR-88 junction. Watch for a sign for “Taos High Road” with an arrow pointing left and another sign for “Oja Sarco / Penasco / Taos”
    • The junction with CR-88 can be hard to spot from NM-76 when returning in the dark. Watch for signs for “County Road 88”, I did not see any signs for “La Puebla Road”.
  • After 29.5 miles, at a T-intersection, turn right onto NM-75.
  • After 1.4 miles, at a fork where NM-75 veers strongly to the left, veer slightly right onto NM-73.
  • After 1.7 miles turn left onto Santa Barbara Road (there is a small sign naming the road, but the junction is otherwise unremarkable).
    • After 2.9 miles on the Santa Barbara Road the road becomes gravel and is currently in excellent shape.
  • After 4.8 miles, after crossing a bridge, the road becomes signed for Forest Road 116. Continue straight ahead
  • After 1.2 miles past the bridge the road ends at the trailhead.

Google’s algorithms currently report that the Santa Barbara Road rejoins with NM-73. That is not correct.

Trailhead:

02 the mighty Camry

The mighty Camry the Rio Santa Barbara Campground

There is a campground immediately past the trailhead, but on this date the campground was gated closed. I was told that the it closes soon after Labor Day. The trailhead consists of a gravel parking lot just before the gate. There is a vault toilet. The Rio Santa Barbara runs past the trailhead and there is a hand pump for potable water, but it is currently wrapped in plastic (much tattered) and duck tape (in better shape). It appears that the forest service closes down the pumps at the trailhead and in the campgrounds once the temperatures fall to near-freezing. Currently, there are no trash receptacles.

The USDA/Forest Service website indicates that usage can be very heavy in the early summer so you will want to arrive early during July.  The Camry was the only car at the trailhead on a Wednesday morning in October. The website mentions a trailhead parking fee of $3.00 per vehicle. A sign just before the trailhead also demands payment, but there were no envelopes at the self-service post nor did the signage at the trailhead make any mention of the dollar amount. It looks as if it may not be worthwhile for the Park Service to collect payments as winter nears.

Data:

  • Start Elevation: 8840 feet
  • Highest Elevation: 13,020 feet
  • Net Elevation: 4180 feet
  • Distance: 11.4 miles (one way!)
  • Maps: USGS Truchas PeakPecos Falls (2017) and Jicarita Peak quadrangles. Surprisingly, the 2017 version of Pecos Falls quadrangle shows the trails. I used the 1995 versions of the other maps that I had downloaded earlier, when the 2017 versions did not display any trails at all.

Hike Description:

Day 1:

03 First Santa Barbara crossing

Western cliffs in morning sunshine

From the trailhead follow the road as it loops across the campground and at the far end of the loop find trail #24, the East Fork Trail. This is a very well maintained tread, perhaps a reflection of the horse-riding community (who can be better organized than us hikers for tasks such as arranging trail work and getting funding for the national trails). The tread bumps along the Rio Santa Barbara in thick conifer forests, starting elevation of just over 8800 feet. On a cool autumn morning you may want to keep a jacket on for the first mile or two – much of the morning will pass before the sun reaches all the way to the river.

04 continue on Trail 25

Depart to #25

The trail initially follows the west bank of the river. Eventually that side of the drainage steepens and the opposite bank beckons. Cross on a broad bridge meant to sustain horse traffic. At 2.4 miles come to a signed junction. The East Fork Trail #24 rises to your left to follow along side the Middle Branch – eventually Trail #24 will reach a second fork where it finally strikes the banks of the East Fork of the Rio Santa Barbara. You, however, should bear right onto the West Fork on Trail #25. The trail goes another 0.3 miles (2.7 miles from the trailhead) before crossing the actual Middle Fork on a sturdy log bridge.

05 Meadow views to Santa Barbara Divide

Chimayosos from river meadows

This is an unbeatable place for an autumn exercise in serene backcountry hiking. The tread is in excellent shape, the grade is mellow, there are occasional glades of tall aspen (which have already lost their fall foliage) and gorgeous meadows. The trail passes through a single gate, suggesting that grazing rights are contracted out or that there is a private in-holding that contains the upper valley.  The surrounding cliff faces are spectacular. Somewhere above those heights to the west lies Trampas Peak.

06 Chimayosos Peak

Chimayosos closeup

At 5.7 miles from the trailhead come to the only crossing of the West Branch. In autumn it is an easy crossing, made easier by a bundle of branches laid across the stones. It would doubtlessly be far more challenging during the spring melt-off. After the crossing the tread takes on a moderately steeper angle. You will find yourself hiking well above the valley bottom, checking out the huge stands of enormously tall aspen on the far side of the valley (perhaps arising from old burns). At 7.3 miles come to the first switchback on the trail – a hint that you’ll need to up your game as the valley ups its gain.

07 lahar

Lahar on steep hillside

The trail remains beautifully maintained, but it crosses odd rocky stretches where the forested hillside displays a dense scattering of gray metamorphic rock on the surface of the forest floor. These are thumb-sized (scree) to fist sized (talus) bits of stone of the sort that splits along planar faces. These flattish stones tend to accumulate on the trail and makes footing a bit awkward. In places where transient streams have descended these rocks are heaped into tall banks, similar to the shape of a wake behind a powerboat. As you get higher you will find yourself crossing deep gouges in the hillside. These look like lahars – stretches of soil and loose rock that (presumably) got water saturated and broke free, ripping four or five foot deep trenches straight down the mountain.

08 junction to No Fish Lake

Hollow stump and cairn at path to No Fish Lake

After rounding the 6th turn on these switchbacks you will begin another steady climb along the much-diminished West Branch. At 8.9 miles enter a gully that contains the highest reaches of the West Branch. The trail leaves the gully and immediately traverses a swale-like water-way. If you want to camp at No Fish Lake then it is time to watch carefully. You may notice a boot-path going up onto the rim of the swale on your right –  if you check, you will find the boot-path descends to a possible campsite with an established fire ring on a bench in the swale. About 100 feet further you will find another campsite about 20 feet off the trail on your left. Within a quarter mile of these initial sites you will come upon the unsigned trail that leads down to No Fish Lake. On this date there was a smallish cairn marking this trail. The tread contained some ancient deadfall, which makes it seem like an unlikely campground trail. Follow it for about 50 feet over a forested spur, however, and you should see No Fish Lake peeking through the trees below you. There are several very pleasant camping sites near the lake’s outflow.

8a Chimayosos Peak from col

Chimayosos Peak from Santa Barbara Divide

Day 2:

From No Fish Lake return to Trail 25 and continue ascending. The forest starts to thin and at 10.1 miles from the trailhead the tread emerges onto a broad slope covered with tussock and talus. Two mellow switchbacks later and you will stride out of the Santa Barbara Drainage and look into the Pecos drainage. Don’t descend! To the east (left on ascent) is the broad and grassy face of Chimayosos Peak. To the west is the broad, but cliff-scarred face of North Truchas. Turn west.

10 opening in fir thicket & North Truchas summit

Fairway through the firs below North Truchas

The west end of the col has a fir thicket on it. The initial wall of these firs, which are closely interwoven, can be difficult to penetrate but inside that wall the trees are well spaced. About half-way through the thicket you will find a ski-trail-like opening that will take you a bit south. That positions you on the upper edge of the thicket with open views to the summit. From here just about any path up will do. My path initially headed straight at the summit, but stiff winds made it advisable to steer from one lonesome fir to the next just for temporary shelter from the breeze. Watch for raptors and big horned sheep. The ground is steep and the air is thin. You may want to practice your rest-step.

10 (S) Truchas, Medios, Middle and the North Truchas cairn

South Truchas (distant-left), Medio and Middle Truchas (ridge in middle ground) and summit cairn in foreground.

There is a cairn at the summit and a small summit log in a plastic container. To the south you will see the span of the Truchas massif, including South Truchas (the high point), “Medios Truchas” (not an official name) and Middle Truchas. Look north to see the Sangre de Cristo mountains ranging all the way into Colorado. To the west lie the Jemez Mountains. You will see the broad profile of Redondo Peak (the high point of the Jemez Mountains) and at the north end of the the Jemez you can pick out Cerro Pedernal in its narrow profile. Return the way you came.

Recommendations:

13 summit pose

Author, blocking view to Chimayosos Peak

I heard a couple rifle shots on the first day I was on the trail. Hikers will want to flaunt their orange attire this time of year. The New Mexico Department of Game & Fish website has data on the various hunting seasons, but it seems to be “siloed” in various Department publications that are broken out by target species. This makes sense if, for example, you want to know if you can hunt for grouse in a given area. But it doesn’t help if you simply want to know if hunters are active in a particular spot. It would be great if they could provide a map-based interface for the non-hunting public. For the record, this hike is entirely enclosed by Game Management Unit number 45 (abbreviated as GMU 45) in the department’s publications. The department’s (non-interactive) map of GMU 45 can be found here.

October is a chilly month for campers at 11,000 feet. Bring good sleeping gear and keep an eye on the weather. Much of the summit block on Truchas is an open grassland, but there are adjacent cliffs that would make this a poor place to practice white-out navigation.

This is a high altitude hike. You’ll want your party to be familiar with the symptoms of acute mountain sickness. An excellent discussion can be found at altitude.org.

Links:

Phil Robinson reports a similar approach in a PeakBagger report, but he and his son used the opportunity to climb Medios Truchas, Middle Truchas, Barbara Peak, Chimayosos as well as North Truchas Peak. Very impressive backpacking and an excellent writeup.

The SummitPost overview is very brief, but it has links along the left side to numerous reports and suggestions about alternative approaches.

A 2007 report from the Los Alamos Mountaineers also makes note of how high the water can get and the difficulty that can cause. (The two bridges on the current route may be newer than that, so at least some of the difficulties may have been addressed).

A writeup on the SantaFe.com website reports that Truchas, the Spanish word for “trout”, is also slang for “knife”. The author speculates that the main ridgeline may have looked knife-like to the conquistadors.