Archives for category: Mogollon Mountains
01  Black - Sacaton Mt to Mogollon Mt

View to Black Mountain (extreme left), Sacaton Peak (center) and Mogollon Baldy (white peak above the saddle between Black and Sacaton Peaks)

Overview:

The Holt-Apache Trail, #181, takes you up the west-facing slopes of the Mogollon Mountains to a view point on the summit block of Holt Mountain. A history of wind and fire has resulted a thin patch of snags that opens to terrific views across the Dry Creeks region of the Mogollons. My turn-back time had arrived so this report does not describe the trail where it ascends the last few hundred feet to the summit of Holt Peak. On a longer day that should be easy to do. It might be even more rewarding to continue along the Apache-Holt trail for another half mile while searching for views down Whitewater Creek and into the heart of the Gila Wilderness. The trail is moderately steep, clinging to canyon bottoms in the first stretch and then mounting well-engineered switchbacks to bring you up out of the canyon. Unfortunately, the trail is being abandoned by the Forest Service. You are needed! Hike this trail and your very tracks will assist in keeping this gorgeous national resource open.

Driving Directions:

  • From US-180 and NM-90 in Silver City, NM, go west onto US-180.
  • After 53.7 miles on US-180 go right onto Sheridan Corral Rd (gravel). The road is officially signed CO54, but there is an informal sign attached to a fence saying “Sheridan Corral”.
  • After 4.0 miles on Sheridan Corral Rd arrive at trailhead at end of road

Sheridan Corral Road is currently in good shape. All the maps I’ve seen depict a loop at the end of Sheridan Corral Road. That loop may exist, but it looks as if it might only be accessible to ATV drivers. If you are driving a truck or car then the end of the road is a smallish gravel pad in front of a weathered trailhead kiosk. I suspect that horse-folk use this trail. Please leave the gravel pad open so that those dragging a horse trailer can turn about. There is a gravel pull-out beside the road just before the pad. You can park in that pull-out.

Trailhead:

02 The Mighty Camry

The Mighty Camry in the pull-out

The trailhead is just a gravel pad and kiosk. There is no trash, vault toilet or water service. You should not count on water running in the canyon (bring your own). There are picnic tables and vault toilets in the Aldo Leopold Vista on US-180, near mile marker 63 (just a few miles south of Sheridan Corral Road). A sign near the start of the trail says that the trail is no longer maintained and that it may be hard to find in places. That last warning is not currently warranted. Finding the trail was straight forward, even when the tread was buried in a half foot of snow.

Data:

  • starting elevation: 6354 feet
  • ending elevation: 9377 feet
  • net elevation gain: 3023 feet
  • total gain: 3804 feet (gps)
  • total decent 3832 feet (gps)
  • distance: 5.0 miles (one way)

Hike Description:

03 Sheridan Mountain

Sheridan Mountain

There is an apparent trail junction right behind the trailhead kiosk. Veering off to the east (to your right, looking uphill) lies a two-track. This may be part of the old loop that once graced the end of Sheridan Mountain Road. You will want to bear northeast (to your left looking uphill). That will take you past a bright yellow warning sign saying that the trail is abandoned and may be hard to find. The trail ascends for a short ways, gaining the top of the ridge between Sheridan Corral Creek and the unnamed canyon to the north. On the ridge the trail meanders back and forth until you enter the Gila Wilderness at 0.6 miles from the trailhead. The signage for the Wilderness boundary is falling to pieces. Past the signs the trail begins a short drop to the canyon bottom. The tread rounds a broad buttress and views open to Sheridan Peak on the east side of the canyon. Above you, on the west side, is much evidence of the Whitewater Baldy Complex fire of 2012. It must have burned hot. Even now, seven years on, the hillside is covered with patchy grass and a strikingly sparse scattering of gray oak. 

05 fallen hoodoo

Post-hoodoo

The fire damage extends all the way to the canyon bottom. This region, protected from winds by canyon walls, is a continuous display of shriveled firs and blackened pines. On this day the creek in the bottom of the canyon was roaring away, displaying a gray-green coloration from the sand and clay it was hauling down from the heights. (There had been recent rain and snow storms). As you continue upstream you will encounter a monumental boulder in the canyon bottom, at 1.5 miles from the trailhead. This boulder may have once been a fin of rock that then wore into a hoodoo, then into a “hanging rock” and then losing to gravity to become a “settling rock”.

06 Holt and Big Dry Creek fork

Junction with N. Fork, Big Dry Creek Trail

The trail twists back and forth across the creek while ascending at a gentle rate. As you pass the boulder you may notice that the fire devastation has eased. Huge old ponderosa and Doug Firs are present, sometimes blackened around their bases but still thriving. At 2.0 miles the trail enters a level, meadowy stretch and comes to a signed junction. The North Fork Big Dry Creek Trail #225 departs to the right. Veer slightly left to stay on the Apache-Holt Trail.

07 spires and fins on canyon rim

Proto-hoodoo

Both of the canyon rims lower as you ascend. The canyon walls open broadly to the sky. The creek bottom is warmer and brighter. The canyon is still quite dramatic, as the rim features tall hoodoos, fins and crown-shaped outcrops. Apparently this segment escaped the fire entirely. The understory includes a particularly clingy form of bramble that can slow your progress considerably. It was a good idea to have gaiters just to deal with the brambles. On this date footprints in the snow showed the passage of both deer and elk. 

08 small death cookie

Snow Pinwheels above the trail

At 3.4 miles the trail leaves the bottom of the canyon and begins a series of carefully constructed switchbacks. The trail builders have thrown long rock walls to shore up the downside of the trail wherever needed. Scratch your head and ask how it is possible that such an investment could possibly be abandoned. The slope above the trail is steep in places. In wintertime you may see snow pinwheels (also known as “death cookies”) scattered along the hillside. These are thought to be evidence of unstable conditions. Exercise some thought before crossing any snow-choked chutes. Up and up and up! Although really it is only a half mile of switchbacks before the trail lurches to your right and makes a long, flat contour to the east. A mosaic of all-green patches and all-burned patches arise at this level, with the burned patches providing you with views back down the canyon.

09 thru-the-trees peak at frosted Holt Peak

Peek to frosted Holt Mountain

The trail eventually reaches a rib-top and turns uphill to follow the rib towards the high ridgeline. Views of Holt Peak can be seen filtered through the evergreens. This is a gorgeous ramble through dense Douglas firs. The snow began to accumulate (on this date) and the junction of the Apache-Holt trail with Holt Gulch Trail #217 was obscured. Fortunately there was enough trail evidence (such as sawn logs or water bars) poking through the snow that the main trail could be followed to the ridge.

10 Viewpoint looking west to Mangas Trench

View south and west to Arizona

The trail slowly climbs to the main ridge line. When you reach the ridge it is worth turning north, off trail, and ascending towards Holt Peak for another hundred feet through open forest. You will find a stark, nearly snag-free burn with views swinging from the east down to the southwest. Looking across both the Big Dry Creek and Little Dry Creek drainages you will see Black Mountain and Sacaton Mountain, with Mogollon Baldy peeking over the ridge between them. You have almost innumerable options at this point. If you have enough daylight hours then the summit of Holt Peak is immediately above you. Energetic campers will want to continue along the Holt-Apache trail into the Mogollon’s high country. Time-limited day hikers, however, will probably want to soak in the sights and return the way they came.

Recommendations:

11 author on Sheridan Corral Trail #181

Author, sheltering from the breeze

  • As with other hikes in the Mogollon Mountains, dedicating just a single day to this hike is going to be frustrating. There is so much you won’t get to see! From my turn-back point it would be only 4.6 more miles to Spider Saddle. From the saddle a range of summits becomes accessible. These include Grouse Mountain, Indian Peak, Black Mountain, Center Baldy, Whitewater Baldy, Willow Mountain and many others. If you have the time then treat this hike as just the approach-leg for an extended stay.
  • Haven’t got a free weekend? Then just do this hike! The canyon is beautiful and the views at the top are great. Plus, this trail (like many others in the Gila) badly needs greater boot-sole solace. Your efforts here will help to keep open a hiking gem.
  • I went through one and a half liters of water on a warm (50 degree) winter’s day. That was plenty. If your own trip is planned for the truly warm months, however, then factor in the effects returning through burned areas (with little shade) in a southwest-facing canyon. The rush of water described in this report was strongly influenced by a recent snow storm and a subsequent rain storm. The canyon bed is likely to be dry in the pre-monsoon season.
  • Consult the weather reports before going on this hike. The remaining snags are aging fast and wind will eventually topple them all. In recent years the snow pack has been terribly light and avalanche concerns have been almost negligible. That said, do watch for patterns of storms that might suddenly increase the risk. There are chutes here that raise your wintertime risk-levels. 
  • I heard just one sharp sound that may have been gun fire. The Gila Wilderness does open for hunting. A National Park Service report (undated) says that turkey season is late April and early May. Deer and elk season for bow hunters is the first three weeks of September, while deer and elk season for rifle hunters is October and November. Bear and cougar season is December and January. An orange wardrobe will continue to be useful for at least another couple weeks.

Links:

There is a detailed route description from 2016 (i.e. post fire) at HikeArizona.

Closures and other official information can be found at the Forest Service site.

“Stav Is Lost” has a trip report that describes a foggy-day approach in wintertime New Mexico. The photos will give you a good idea of what you are heading into, with emphasis on how the 2012 Whitewater Baldy Complex fire took a big toll on this part of the world.

The Casitas de Gila page has a 2015 trip report, but one that only extends for the first 1.5 miles of the hike. The geological discussion at the end is very interesting. They also recommend picking a calm day.

01 Dry Creek Drainage to West Baldy

View up Little Dry Creek to West Baldy

Overview:

This is a splendid trail. It wanders more than three miles along a creek that currently enjoys a pleasant run of water. The “creek” is flanked with enormous canyon walls. Eventually the trail leaves the canyon bottom and offers you a brisk, mile-long ascent onto a high ridge line in the Mogollon Mountains. The trailhead is easy to access. Views, wildlife and solitude abound. 

In fact, that solitude may be a bit too abundant. Forest Trail #180 is in painful need of hiker affection. In its upper reaches there is some deadfall to clamber across. In places the trail is slowly rolling back into conformation with the hillside. Tufts of grass grow in the tread and brush is starting to encroach at knee level. You are needed! Get out there and show some boot-sole sympathy for this great diversion into the Gila National Forest. The Mogollons are magnificent and your hike will maintain access to this high terrain.

Driving Directions:

  • In Silver City, NM set your odometer to zero at the intersection of US-180 (signed as “Silver Heights Blvd”) and NM-90 (signed as “Hudson Street”) and go west on US-180.
  • After 50.5 miles, past mile marker 63 and immediately past the signed bridge over Little Dry Creek, turn right onto Sacaton Road (gravel, well signed).
  • After 2.8 miles, at a T-intersection, turn left onto Forest Road 196 (signed as “196”), also known as Little Dry Creek Road.
  • After 3.3 miles, at the road end, park at the trailhead.

Sacaton Road has been recently graded and is in very good condition. FR-196 is also in good condition. There was no problem with using a sedan to get to the trailhead.

Trailhead:

02 Mighty Camry


The Mighty Camry at the trailhead

The trailhead is a turn-about at the end of FR-196. There is a kiosk and a yellow warning sign to let you know that recent fires have created certain risks along the trail. There is no water, no trash receptacles nor vault toilets. If you are coming from Silver City then the Aldo Leopold Vista on the west side of US-180 (0.6 miles before the Sacaton turn) provides both vistas and vault toilets. When parking at the trailhead please leave space so that folks pulling horse trailers can maneuver.

Data:

  • Lowest Elevation: 6252 feet
  • Highest Elevation: 8455 feet
  • Net Elevation Gain: 2203 feet
  • Total Elevation Gain: 3324 feet (per GPS)
  • Miles: 4.7 miles (one way)

Hike Description:

The lower stretch of Little Dry Creek Canyon has been described previously on this blog. For greater narrative detail you can link to that description here. This post will simply show some landmarks along that mellow tread, and then resume a narrative of the hike when the trail leaves the canyon bottom.

03 first fin of rock

First fin, nearly damming the creek

From the trailhead, climb briefly on a rock-riddled two-track  and arrive at a height of land with wonderful views of the canyon. The trail then descends to the canyon bed. At 0.9 miles from the trailhead come to a deep cut where Little Dry Creek has sawed into a fin of rock. The trail rises on the west side (to your left on ascent) to get around this fin.

04 reflected light

Light reflected off the west wall

Continuing upstream, the trail hop-scotches the stream bed and arrives at a second fin (with a short detour to a pretty waterfall) at 1.4 miles. In the early morning most of the light in the canyon bed has been reflected off of the western walls of the canyon.

05 midforest water faucet

Orphaned faucet

At 1.5 miles you will pass a faucet strangely stranded in the middle of the woods. Water pressure must be good, since it was dripping briskly on this date. The rationale for this faucet arrives at 2.1 miles where an abandoned cabin stands. As always, be careful around abandoned buildings in New Mexico. Hanta virus is a genuine threat and those sagging walls don’t look any too sturdy.

At 2.7 miles come to a small meadow that extends to the west from the stream. Take note of the trail junction in this meadow. On your return you will want to bear to your left at this junction and stay near the bed of Little Dry Creek.

07 pinched trailbed below main wall

Pinched stream bed

Looking ahead you will see a tremendous canyon wall dropping down on the east side of the creek. As you enter this part of the creek steep walls on the west side come down to create a strikingly pinched passage. This is close to being a slot canyon – although the walls are not quite vertical.

Another hard rock intrusion at 3.3 miles forces the trail to rise about 30 feet into a side cut. Visible high above you in the side cut is a towering hoodoo.

09 Wintery View of Mogollon Ridge

wintery view as the trail rises above the stream bed

At 3.6 miles come to a raised shelf on the west side of Little Dry Creek. This would make a good camping spot that already contains a substantial fire ring. The previous post on Little Dry Creek describes a departure from the trail from this spot to follow Little Dry Creek as it reaches up towards Packsaddle Canyon. To reach Windy Gap you should scout the canyon wall above the fire ring and you will find the tread as it snakes around deadfall and past Douglas fir into higher and colder terrain.

10 steep terrain.

view to Mogollon ridge line

The trail now has a spirited go at gaining altitude. No more Mr. Mellow Fellow. Passing through small stands of fir separated by brush-filled terrain, the ascent provides unsettling views into the fire-decimated upper reaches of Little Dry Creek. You will note a change in the quality of the trail as well. In places the path is strewn with branches or rocky debris. In other places the tread is drifting downslope, so that you have to angle your ankles to get a good grip on the side of the mountain. More boots are needed to keep this trail open!

11 dense fire-kill near Windy Gap

Fire kill

At 3.9 miles from the trailhead the trail crosses a small ravine and gentles slightly. Contouring around one last buttress it enters Rainstorm Canyon and tracks the canyon to a saddle on the long ridge that separates Little Dry Creek to the east from Big Dry Creek to the west. This is an increasingly somber bit of trail. At first the fire damage seems pretty minimal – just an occasional snag or two remains standing near to the trail. But as you ascend each stand of snags get thicker and these stands get closer together. The fire has introduced an entirely new ground story. This canyon wall is thick with grey oak, Gambel’s oak, small mountain mahogany and a plentitude of single-stalk, long-thorned plants that you may learn to avoid. A nice ponderosa forest would have been wonderful, but clearly the flora in these mountains are coming back.

12 Windy Gap looking over Big Dry Creek

View across Big Dry Creek from Windy Gap

The fire was not as intense at Windy Gap and a nice stand of fir trees remain standing. That they were damaged is not in doubt (the trail was thick with fallen branches). But this patch of surviving forest makes for a nice segue onto the ridge line. From the Gap the chief view is across the upper reaches of Big Dry Creek. Holt Mountain stands to the northeast and Grouse Mountain stands to the north. On this date Windy Gap was well named, provoking a quick change into warmer attire. December is wintery, even in this far-southern mountain range.

12 Elk horn ridge, looking down Little Dry Creek

View from Elk Horn Rib

The ridge crest and the northeast side of the ridge suffered greater damage than the Little Dry Creek side. You may find that the trail above you is strewn with debris. Don’t let that stop you. It is perfectly possible to pick your way past the deadfall and rise up into the higher reaches of the Mogollons. On this date I was only able to go another half mile before hitting my turnaround time. There is a small, flat-topped rib that juts south into the upper basin of Little Dry Creek. The rib terminates with a dramatic cliff. Some generous soul has positioned a big, bleached elk horn on the top of that cliff. Past the horn you get a fantastic view down Little Dry Creek and your path back to the trailhead. 

Recommendations:

14 author before ridge to West Baldy

Author, blocking your view to the ridge connecting to West Baldy

  • Get those boots on and go. The internet is nothing compared to Little Dry Creek.
  • There were quite a few cattle along the starting stretch of the trail. They seemed to be pretty comfortable around people, but if you encounter them then give them as wide a berth as you can. They are not gazelle-like in any way and they do not move comfortably on uneven terrain.
  • I went through a liter of water and had another two liters available. That was probably overkill for a cool winter’s day. I suspect that Little Dry Creek earns its middle name in most months. It would be wisest to bring along all the water you may need. 
  • It would have been great to have a few more hours in the day. This would be a terrific mid-May hike if you wanted to get to the summit of Sacaton Mountain or Black Peak. 
  • Consider bringing along some garden shears and a harsh attitude towards thorn bushes.  Hopefully, your efforts will make others more comfortable on the trail and perhaps the Forest Service may take note of increased public interest.

Links:

As mentioned in the earlier post, there are descriptions and discussion of this trail at both the Casitas de Gila Nature Blog and at Doug Scott Art. 

The Forest Service website has a report dated 2012 that indicates that the Little Dry Creek Trail is officially closed. (The site also notes that it is not being actively update due tot the the partial government shutdown of late December, 2018). They tell readers, “Visitors are reminded that wildernesses are places where safety is a personal responsibility.” This is true.

01 View into the canyon near the start

Overview:

The Little Dry Creek Trail rises through spectacular canyon terrain on the wild west side of the Mogollon Mts. Despite its name, the water in the creek bed was flowing cheerfully on this post-monsoon date. A sign at the trailhead says the trail is abandoned, but it looks as though someone has put a great deal of recent effort into keeping the path open for the first three miles – to the point where you first see trunks charred by of 2012 Whitewater Baldy fire. The older maps show that the trail used to continue upward to Windy Gap, which once made for a nice 2000-foot gain. Unfortunately the higher terrain is deeply littered with debris from the fire and is now home to remarkably thorny brush. It has to be admitted that I did not find the upward continuation of the trail. Most people, I think, will want to have a mellow day in the gorgeous lower canyon lands and turn back where the first charred trunks appear. The more adventurous will want to wear ballistic fiber gaiters and maintain a high degree of pace patience. 

Driving Directions:

  • In Silver City NM, starting at the junction of US-180/NM-90, go west on US-180. In Silver City the street signs call these roads “Silver Heights Blvd” and “Hudson Street”, respectively.
  • After 50.5 miles on US-180, past mile marker 63, go right onto Sacaton Road (becomes gravel). 
  • After 2.9 miles on Sacaton Road make a left onto Little Dry Creek Road (signed as Forest Service Road 196). You might be expecting a fork if you’re looking at Google Maps, but the junction looks much more like a T-intersection.
  • After 3.4 miles on Dry Creek Road, at its end, park at the trailhead.

EDIT: the Sacaton Road was re-graded sometime in December. As of 12/25/2018 the road was in quite good shape. The following “original comment” is being left in place to warn drivers that the road can be rough.

The Sacaton Road [was] in poor shape. Fist-sized talus lies strewn across the road in many places and there are sudden dips where the numerous small washes cross over the road. My low-slung Camry made it, but family sedan drivers will want to drive very slowly at each wash crossing. Fortunately, Dry Creek Road is in much better shape. 

Trailhead:

02 the Mighty Camry at Dry Creek Trailhead

Kiosk backing the Mighty Camry

The trailhead is just a wide gravel pad with an information kiosk at the end of Little Dry Creek Road. There is no water, trash receptacles or water. There should be little competition for parking space, but you should try to leave space so that folks pulling horse trailers can turn around.

Data:

The map above has a red waypoint marker to show where the trail turns away from the stream bed to ascend the west-side wall (on your left, ascending). The blue markers indicate earlier trail features that may be useful in identifying the departure point.

  • start elevation: 6280
  • ending elevation: 7720
  • net elevation: 1440 feet
  • Distance: 4.2 miles (one way)

(A note on blogging conventions: most of the earlier posts made explicit mention of the USGS map (or maps) that cover the trail. This is beginning to seem like a disservice as other mapping options now seem better suited to hiking. Hikers should look into online options such as CalTopo. I haven’t yet used any of the other services, but many online commenters make favorable mention of AllTrails or Open Street Maps as well ).

Hike Description:

03 flood warning

Little Camping Next 3 Miles!

The trail begins immediately to the right of the information kiosk. You will note a bright yellow sign to the left of the kiosk warning that flooding occurs and that camping in flood plains is not recommended. The canyon bottom is narrow, the canyon walls are steep and you will find little camping space outside of this essentially continuous flood plain. The trail ascends for the first quarter mile on an aging and rock-strewn two-track. At the top is a terrific view towards West Baldy and the large folds of weathered rock that conceal this enormous canyon. Drink in the view and continue forward as the two-track dives towards the canyon bed. There isn’t much room for cattle in the canyon bottom so it seems unlikely that ranchers would have developed this road. This two-track may be a product of the generally unsuccessful effort to find mineral wealth in the Mogollon Mountains. 

02 an intrusion of hard rock nearly damming Dry Creek

Intrusion of hard rock, left side of photo

The two-track reforms into a single track path at the canyon bottom. Immediately ahead is an enormous curtain of hard rock that almost dams the creek. The stream beats the seam, however, and water has sawn a narrow slot right through the formation. The trail builders have found a way up the west wall of the canyon (to your left on ascent) to take you safely past this barrier. This establishes a noticeable pattern on the trail. It will amble along peaceably and then suddenly lurch towards the sky to surmount the next waterfall. 

05 waterfall across a hard intrusion

One of many waterfalls in Dry Creek

The creek meanders considerably and the steep outside wall of each bend is hostile to the intent of trail engineers. Consequently, the trail displays a creek-leaping tendency each time a new inside-bend presents itself. It was possible to ascend dry footed on this date, but in wetter seasons it could be a challenge. As mentioned there is a pattern of waterfalls where harder rock intrudes. You may find it worth while to head upstream, off-trail for a short distance, to investigate some of these pretty falls and their deep pools. It can be chilly on an autumn morning. The sun does not reach the canyon bottom until late in the day. Dense stands of pinion pines and scrub oak (Arizona White Oak, making a cross-boundaries appearance) provide further shade for the first two miles of the hike.

06 abandoned mining cabin

Miner’s Cabin

At about two miles you will find a weather beaten,  cabin, falling into ruin. This may be the upper limit of where pack animals could reach and the most convenient place to drop off mining supplies. Building roads and erecting cabins is hard work, testimony to the persistence of those seeking a living in this rugged landscape. Maps indicate that one old mine, the Maverick Prospect, might be found on the east wall above this cabin.

06 water to sky

Canyon Bed to Canyon Rim

From time to time the walls angle steeply back and admit a little sunlight to the creek. In such places the trail warms up and the vegetation thrives. You may get peek-a-boo views of the canyon ahead, where towering rock walls (300 feet high? 600?) will cast the trail back into cool canyon gloom. These are the places where you will see most of the animal sign. There was bear scat on the trail and occasional evidence of elk. At 2.4 miles from the trailhead you will note that the pinyon pine that dominated the lower route has given way to enormous ponderosa pine.

08a Massive cliff flank of West Baldy

Peek-a-boo view to major canyon wall

A mighty wall of rock descends from the flanks of West Baldy Mountain to the east side of the stream bed, and it is chiefly this wall that you will have seen from those earlier peek-a-boo views. Before reaching the foot of this wall, at about 2.8 miles from the trailhead and just before a prominent waterfall, watch for the tread to depart sharply uphill. The trail ascends on the east side (right side, looking up-canyon) and makes a switchback or two. Looking up this eastern cut you will see a large hoodoo high above. This is a clear sign that you are nearing the point where the old trail diverged from the canyon bottom.

A short distance further, at 3.0 miles, come to the end of the cleared portion of the trail. Here you will see the first evidence of fire damage along the trail. There is a camping spot with a fire-ring on a protected shelf beside the trail. This is where the maps show the old Little Dry Creek Trail departing from the stream bed and clambering along above the bed for about a quarter mile, then entering a side cut. This side cut (possibly called Rainwater Canyon) leads to Windy Gap on the ridge. Satellite images show a very obvious tread once you get about 100 feet above the canyon bed, but below the trail is screened by the Ponderosa and Douglas fir that dominates near the water.

08 Mogollon Ridge from turnback point

View to the ridgeline of the Mogollon Mountains

Frankly, I missed the point where the trail departed the canyon bottom and simply continued uphill along the stream bed. The terrain is as wild as any I’ve seen and, despite the fire, quite beautiful. It is markedly more difficult hiking. Part of the difficulty is due to the vegetation that has grown up in the years since the fire. Thorny, tough and dense, it covers holes in the ground and screens the lurking piles of burn debris. Navigation is easy in the canyon bottom but your pace will be slow. Look for short stretches where Little Dry Creek has scrubbed away plants and dirt alike, providing a sidewalk-like path on naked rock. Beware! Ice on this rock can persist all day long. In other places short stretches of animal trail can ease your passage markedly. I turned back after reaching 4.2 miles and having found clear views to the main ridgeline of the Mogollon Mountains. A great day, even though my gaiters will never be the same!

Recommendations:

10 Author in hunting season attire

Author in hunting season attire

The trailhead is only 6.3 miles from US-180, but don’t let that fool you. This is wilderness. Bring a shovel and perhaps a bow saw in your car, so that you can handle any minor issues that may occur on the roads leading to the trailhead. A single thunderstorm could create real problems.

I suspect that Little Dry Creek really is dry most of the year. Bring plenty of water. I went through one liter and that was fine for a pre-Thanksgiving day, but in warmer weather you will need a lot more. The Mogollon ridge line can be very dry, so if you are heading up there be extra careful about your supplies.

From the trail the miner’s cabin appears to be in good shape (for an untended “historic place”) but it is not so very good that it couldn’t fall on you. Moreover, it probably houses a population of mice and in New Mexico there is a genuine concern with mice as carriers of hanta virus.

In this deep canyon cell phone service may be non-existent. Let people know where you are going and when you expect to return.

The shade from rock and vegetative sources may make this a nice warm season hike, particularly if you are going to stay in the lower stretches of the canyon.

Links:

The Casitas de Gila Nature Blog has an interesting discussion of the trail and its link to mining history in New Mexico and a separate post describing some other historical aspects and the geology of the region.

Doug Scott Art has a very enthusiastic review of the hike (this blog is a terrific resource on the slot canyons and waterfalls in New Mexico).